Czech Republic Modern History

Czech Republic Modern History

In March 2009, the Topolánek government failed due to a vote of no confidence in parliament. J. Fischer , head of the national statistics agency, formed a transitional cabinet. In the elections to the House of Representatives in May 2010, the ČSSD won most of the seats (56), but compared to 2006 – just like the ODS – it suffered a considerable loss of votes. For the first time, the parties TOP 09 and VV (= Věci veřejné; Public Affairs Party) entered parliament. P. Nečas (ODS) became Prime Minister at the head of a center-right coalition made up of ODS, TOP 09 and VV. The government alliance came about in 2011 because of corruption allegations, which ultimately led to the resignation of VV politician and Minister of Transport Vít Bárta (* 1973) led to a serious crisis. On December 14, 2011, the House of Representatives decided to introduce direct elections for the President. After Bárta was convicted of bribery in April 2012, the VV faction split in 2012. Several MPs who have resigned from the VV or who are still loyal to the government continue to support Prime Minister Nečas, who was able to decide a vote of confidence in parliament on April 27, 2012 in his favor. In the run-up to the vote, around 100,000 people protested against the government’s austerity policy. On November 7, 2012, the government was only just able to win a renewed vote of confidence in connection with the adoption of tax increases with 101 out of 200 votes. The cabinet work continued to be burdened by allegations of corruption and the resignation of ministers. In the second round of the presidential election on 25/26 1. In 2013, the former Prime Minister Zeman was able to defeat the TOP 09 Chairman and Foreign Minister Karel (Fürst zu) Schwarzenberg with 58.4% of the votes(* 1937) enforce, which received 45.2% of the vote. Prime Minister Nečas announced his resignation on June 17, 2013 in connection with a corruption and spying affair. On June 25, 2013, President Zeman appointed Jiři Rusnok (* 1960) as the new head of government. The cabinet formed by him was sworn in on July 10, 2013. The new government failed on August 7, 2013 in a vote of confidence in parliament.

In the election to the House of Representatives on 25./26. 10. In 2013, according to globalsciencellc, the parties of the center-right government of 2010 suffered heavy losses. The ODS only achieved 16 mandates (2010: 53), TOP 09 had 26 mandates (2010: 41), VV no longer stood as a candidate after corruption scandals and internal party conflicts (2010: 24 mandates). The strongest force was the ČSSD with 50 seats (2010: 56), the KSČM received 33 seats (2010: 26) and the KDU-ČSL managed to get back into parliament with 14 seats. Two parties, newly founded in 2011 and 2013 respectively, sent MPs to parliament for the first time: ANO, which campaigned to fight corruption and run the state “like a company”, won 47 seats and thus became the second strongest force, the antigypsy right-wing U svit came to 14 mandates. B. Sobotka (ČSSD) formed a tripartite coalition (ČSSD, ANO, KDU-ČSL) of the center-left. President M. Zeman swore in thenew cabinet ledby Sobotka on January 29, 2014. On February 19, 2014, the Sobotka government received parliament’s confidence with 110 out of 200 votes. In the European elections on May 23 and 24, 2014, the ANO was the strongest party with 16.1%. Under the ruling center-right alliance, the country experienced positive economic development and low unemployment rates. Prime Minister Sobotka and his party ČSSD could not benefit from this in opinion polls and in local elections, while the ANO of the Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister A. Babiš gained popularity. Here was Babiš, who had built up in previous years, a conglomerate in the areas of agriculture, chemistry and media, economic interests and political power in the public criticism advised allegations of amalgamation. There were also allegations of fraud in relation to EU funds. In the fall of 2016, parliament passed a law that allows members of the government, inter alia, to the operation of media is prohibited. Increasing tensions between Babiš and Sobotka then led to a serious domestic political crisis in 2017, when he initially announced the resignation of the entire government on May 2, 2017, but also with President Zeman could not reach an agreement. On May 24, 2017, Babiš was finally released after tens of thousands had protested against his stay in the government. Sobotka resigned the chairmanship of the ČSSD on June 15, 2017.

Babiš led his party ANO in the parliamentary elections on 20/21. 10. 2017 with the win of 29.6% of the votes and 78 mandates to an overwhelming victory. The second strongest force was the ODS with 11.3% of the vote and 25 mandates. The Pirate Party received 10.8% of the vote and 22 seats, the right-wing populist SPD 10.6% of the votes and also 22 seats. The strongest party to date, the ČSSD, experienced an election debacle and only got 7.3% of the votes and 15 members of parliament. Babiš formed a minority cabinet of ANO politicians and non-party experts and was sworn in as Prime Minister on December 13, 2017. In a vote of confidence in parliament on January 16, 2018, his government did not achieve the required majority and then announced its resignation on January 17, 2018. Previously, incumbent M. Zeman had in the presidential election on 12./13. 1. In 2018, with around 38.6% of the votes, it failed to achieve the necessary absolute majority. So on 26./27. 1. In 2018 a runoff election between Zeman and the second-placed candidate Jiří Drahoš (* 1949), the former President of the Academy of Sciences, is necessary. With a gain of around 51.4% of the votes, Zeman was just able to oppose himself Drahoš prevail. On June 6, 2018, Babiš was sworn in again as Prime Minister by President Zeman and charged with forming a government. An alliance of ANO and the social democratic ČSSD has been in power since the end of June 2018.

Czech Republic Modern History